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Articulation

To put it simply, articulation (artic for short) has to do with expressive language. It is the way someone says each sound. Now, given on where you live, some sound errors are accepted, like not saying an 'r' at the end of a word. More...

Fluency

Fluency is the rhythm of speech. When speech is disrupted and isn't fluent, it is called disfluency, or stuttering. More...

Language

Now, every speech pathologist will tell you that a receptive language delay is difficulty with language comprehension and an expressive language delay is difficulty with verbal expression. Sometimes all the medical jargon leaves you scratching your head and saying "okay…" More...

Who I am

My name is Rebecca, and I'm a speech language pathologist (SLP) in Washington state. I graduated with a masters degree in communication disorders from Eastern Washington University. Since then, I have worked in schools implementing services for bilingual and monolingual children from the ages of preK-5th grade. More...

Language

Board Games for Therapy

It's pretty simple to turn (almost) any board game into a therapy session - SLPs have been doing it for years! To begin, you need three things: More...

Box Monster Craft

What's more fun than making crafts? How about a monster? We can combine the two into a fun language based activity (and can later use it for quick speech sessions). Box monsters are a pretty easy craft, and lend themselves to personal creativity. Following directions, basic concepts, and even actions are language targets that connect with this activity. More...

Car activities

Practicing language can be as simple as spending time talking in the car. Daily work can be finished before you even get home. For receptive language difficulties, simply talking to your child about items you pass while driving. If your child is working on actions, focus on actions you do and see while driving, like a dog running or someone eating. More...

Categorizing with Toys

Categorizing is a skill that can be taught using toys you already have. Grab a random assortment of toys or figurines and place them in a group in front of your child. Ten-15 toys is a good amount to start with. Grab one toy for each group you want to make, and label it for your child. More...

Developmental Power of Books

Specialists have been saying it for years - read to your child. It encourages development. But some parents wonder when to introduce books, or what kind of books they should be using with their child. Read on for some book ideas for young children, both typically developing and when you have developmental concerns. More...

Easy sensory activity

Sometimes you need a little adventure. Sensory activities are fun for any kid, but especially loved by children with sensory impairments (such as being on the autism spectrum, for example). More...

Five 5-minute activities for language development

During the summer it can be hard to focus on speech related tasks. Here are five ideas for quick activities you can do each day to focus on language. More...

Following the leader

Following directions activities often center on making food or miscellaneous chores around the house. One way to increase the fun while following directions is by playing a childhood favorite game: Follow the Leader. More...

Forts

What kid doesn't like building forts? One of my favorite memories from my childhood is building forts using sheets, the dining room table, and chairs. Not only is fort building a fun activity, it segues easily into many animal units taught by SLPs or preschool programs. More...

Functional Communication

I have been asked recently several questions about young, non-verbal children. Here I address the main themes: functional communication and problematic behaviors. More...

Halloween Language Activities

Sometimes you want to incorporate language learning into a festive activity. Here are a few ideas to focus on language while getting into the Halloween spirit. More...

Home Prepositions

Using toys can be a great way to work on prepositions, but being silly and using your bodies can be even better! More...

Langauge in the summer sun

Summer can bring about excitement about being outside, but this excitement can quickly lead to dreams of a dip in some water.Language can be incorporated into these hot times with a paintbrush, a cup of water, and some imagination. Find a clear spot of sidewalk or the driveway to paint on. More...

Language development through books

It's no secret that pre literacy skills are vital in language as well as academic development. The easiest way to develop pre literacy skills in young children is simply by exposure to books. Here are some ideas on how to focus on language development using books. More...

Monster Sort

Small boxes are great for storage as well as language activities. Box monsters make language even more fun. Grab a monster or two, and some items to sort. Toy food, figurines, speech pictures, small stuffed animals, barbies, cars…the possibilities are endless for toys to fit into the monsters. More...

Summertime picnics

The call of the outdoors can be intense during nice weather. Taking speech outside is a fun way to have a change of scene and enjoy the park or backyard. Start this activity by talking with your child about what happens on a picnic. Better yet More...

The Kitchen: recipes for language development

The kitchen is a great place to work on speech skills in a practical, hands on way. One way to work on language is to have your child help put away clean dishes by following directions (ex. "Put the plates in the cupboard, then the forks in the drawer".) More...

Toss and Talk for Langauge

Some days, sitting speech therpay just isn't going to work. A simple solution is to transform therapy into a more active session. To do this, we grab a bouncy ball and a permanent marker. More...

Up Up Down Down (Receptive)

*Up, Up, Down, Down* is a game I created for kids to burn some energy during those transition times that frequently occur during during a preschool program. More...

Artic

Articulation in the kitchen

The kitchen does not have to be the domain of only language-based speech therapy. Articulation is a skill that can be addressed in many ways that provide opportunities to practice sounds. It does not have to be relegated to a "speech" room. More...

Books for Artic

Books aren't only for language development - they can be used for articulation therapy as well. The key is to pick a book that is loaded with the sound your child is working on. If you cannot think of one... More...

Dice game

When your child is working on articulation, therapy usually consists of some type of drill activity using words that contain the error sound. This can get boring for your child especially when you attempt to continue the therapy in the home. More...

Hide and Seek Articulation

A hide and seek game is another way to work on articulation without the monotony of a straight drill practice. More...

Mr. Monster Articulation

Need a new trick to work on speech words at home? Use a monster! Monster boxes are tissue boxes that have been modified into monsters. More...

Picture-Based Games

Pictures create a world of possibilities when it comes to articulation. If you have pictures, you can have a scavenger hunt, play a matching game, or "Go Fish." They also lend themselves to direct drill for a quick speech practice. More...

Shopping for Articulation

It's possible to take speech therapy on the go while doing normal activities. Shopping can easily integrate into articulation therapy. More...

Bilingual

Referrals and Language Exposure

Little Sveta moves from Russia to your district in the States. Only a few weeks attending her new school, the teacher is standing in your door asking to refer Sveta for speech and language services. What do you do? Is it appropriate to accept the referral? How are you going to determine her language capabilities? More...

The Bilingual Child: A language difference or delay?

Children who learn English as a Second Language can sometimes appear to have a language delay. Many times, these children are referred for speech therapy in school, or parents may have concerns regarding their children's acquisition of language due to the complex nature of learning multiple languages. Just how do you tell the difference between a normal language difference or a language delay? More...